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Civil Rights Movement

 

The Civil Right Movement was the social movement to fight the hate and racial segregation against the African Americans during 1954-1968 in the United States. The segregation was in most part in the south of the country which for many years African Americans were used as the slaves of white families. Even though the United States was known as a free country, the lack of freedom was missing for the black Americans people. Masses protest movements against discrimination most of the time were represented by the leadership and philosophy of Martin Luther King, Jr., who was one of or the most important person when we talk about Civil Right Movement. King won the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize for his role in the movement.

Before the American Civil War white people “men in specific” had the right for everything they wanted in comparison with blacks who were very limited and not treated the same way as white people were. Jim Crow was the name that was used to called the practice of segregation black people in the U.S. Two month after the U.S. entered the WWII Black leaders made numerous strides against the racial discrimination. Many black organizations joined different forces with the help of unions and many politicians. Blacks and white’s liberals were risking their jobs and their life to fight against all these hates and to end the segregation that was occurring in schools at the time. Organizations like the “KKK” were very angry by the fact that African American were putting pressure on the President and the Supreme Court to end the segregation. Homes, Churches, and Schools were burned by the “KKK” to kill African American Organizer like Dr. King, Jr.

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka was one of the cases that helped the Civil Rights Movement to end the segregation in schools. NAACP members E. D. Nixon and Rosa Parks began to protest on buses which lead to a large-scale boycott of buses and of white-owned business in Montgomery, Alabama. Rosa Parks was one the pillars of this movements, after not following the rule of the buses at the time that stated, “blacks to move to the back of buses when no seats were available for whites” she was arrested because refuses to give up her seat for a white passenger which was in the “colored section” of the bus. Leaders from the African America community during the Civil Rights era, Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, Malcolm X, Andrew Goodman and others risked their life and in many cases lost their life in the name of freedom and equality.

In 1963, nearly 200,000 people march on Washington, D.C. The same Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his famous speech “I have a dream” in which he calls the entire country for an end of the segregation, hate, discrimination and inequality in the United States and called for Civics and economics rights. In 1964, The Civil Rights Act was signed by President Johnson that prohibits “discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin It ended unequal application of voter registration requirements and racial segregation in schools, at the workplace and by facilities that served the public.” We also must give credit to President John F. Kennedy who called this bill in his speech the year before.

Social movements are very important part of our freedom and can lead us to change. I think that what this group of activists did and what they scarify all paid off in the future. Personally, it’s impossible to see this country segregated again, all those marches and protest for equality pushed us more and more to the real freedom. Even though the country right now it’s separated and the wealth is all in one side, it could have been worse if these powerful men don’t stand up against racism in the United States.

 

Further Readings:

http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/civil-rights-movement

 

http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/tserve/freedom/1917beyond/essays/crm.htm

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