Supplemental Poverty Measure

Photo Credits: http://poverty.ucdavis.edu/policy-brief/supplemental-poverty-measure-better-measure-poverty-america The lack of economic resources for consumption of basic needs such as food, housing, clothing, and utilities. Gross money income from private and public sources is supplemented with benefits such as food stamps, housing subsidies, and tax credits in order to determine family resources.  Medical out-of-pocket expenses such as health insurance premiums,...

Self-Sufficiency Standard

The self-sufficiency standard is the amount of money a household must make in order to meet the basic standard of living without government assistance.  This measure was created as an alternative to the federal poverty standard, which was created in 1965 and equated the basic standard of living to three times the cost for...

The Self-Sufficiency Standard

  As an alternative to the outdated federal poverty measure, The University of Washington developed the self-sufficiency standard; this standard estimates the amount of income a household of a given size, age and location needs to pay for their necessities without government assistance. Unlike the federal poverty measure, the self-sufficiency standard accounts for living...

Federal Poverty Measure

  Introduced by Mollie Orshansky in 1964 and adopted by former President Lyndon B. Johnson, the current official U.S. poverty measure classifies those who fall below a standard of need and sets eligibility thresholds for public programs (e.g., food stamps). Because the average American household spent one-third of their income on food, this guideline...

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